COINTELPRO How we are programmed to hate each other

NO… ITS NOT JUST YOU! In this show we do a full overview of the COINTEL program and uncover the covert tactics used by well funded government programs.

Here is a link to the JTRIG slides mentioned in the show:
JTRIG The Art of Deception

 

Topics covered in this show:

Co-Intel Tactics used

  • Circular Arguments
  • Baiting
  • Bait and Switch
  • Disagreeing just for the sake of disagreeing
    Diffusion of Innovation
  • Accusations and Psychological Projection
  • Say “Show me the facts” as a defensive statement  (when you’ve shown the facts and they ignore them)
  • Take a small portion of a larger story and misrepresent it.
  • Suggestive tones and language meant to bait, raise suspicion, create doubt, and destabilize natural momentum. 
  • Pretend to be “On your side” sympathize with your cause, then turn on you.
  • Excuse their harmful  behavior by saying “Well that’s just your interpretation”
  • Lure in followers by claiming “I know something you don’t know” (lots of pregnant pauses in their speaking)
  • Spreading false or skewed information or lying through omission
  • Overly Sensationalizing everything
  • Excessive cursing, vulgarity and offensive behavior
  • Claiming to be a victim
  • Alias management and legend building

Social Identity theory
Social identity is a person’s sense of who they are based on their group membership(s).

Social penetration theory
The social penetration theory proposes that, as relationships develop, interpersonal communication moves from relatively shallow, non-intimate levels to deeper, more intimate ones.[1]

The social penetration theory states that this process occurs primarily through self-disclosure and closeness develops if the participants proceed in a gradual and orderly fashion from superficial to intimate levels of exchange as a function of both immediate and forecast outcomes.

10 principles of scams
1. Distraction
2. Social compliance exploiting our automatic deference to authority figures.
3. Herd principle People are sheep: they can’t help following each other.
4. Dishonesty Fear is the mind-killer.
5. Deception People are easily tricked, even when they think they are being careful.
6. Need and greed Once hustlers know what people want, even if it doesn’t exist, they are in a position to manipulate them.
7. Time pressure when there’s no time to think people rely on short cuts and emotional responses to a situation.

Hindsight bias
also known as the knew-it-all-along effect or creeping determinism, is the inclination, after an event has occurred, to see the event as having been predictable, despite there having been little or no objective basis for predicting it.

Gaslighting
manipulate (someone) by psychological means into questioning their own sanity. It’s a form of psychological abuse used by narcissists in order to instill anxiety and confusion in their victim’s.

Confirmation bias
Confirmation bias, also called confirmatory bias or myside bias, is the tendency to search for, interpret, favor, and recall information in a way that confirms one’s preexisting beliefs or hypotheses, while giving disproportionately less consideration to alternative possibilities. It is a type of cognitive bias and a systematic error of inductive reasoning. People display this bias when they gather or remember information selectively, or when they interpret it in a biased way. The effect is stronger for emotionally charged issues and for deeply entrenched beliefs. People also tend to interpret ambiguous evidence as supporting their existing position. Biased search, interpretation and memory have been invoked to explain attitude polarization (when a disagreement becomes more extreme even though the different parties are exposed to the same evidence), belief perseverance (when beliefs persist after the evidence for them is shown to be false), the irrational primacy effect (a greater reliance on information encountered early in a series) and illusory correlation (when people falsely perceive an association between two events or situations).
Anchoring
Anchoring or focalism is a cognitive bias that describes the common human tendency to rely too heavily on the first piece of information offered (the “anchor”) when making decisions. During decision making, anchoring occurs when individuals use an initial piece of information to make subsequent judgments. Once an anchor is set, other judgments are made by adjusting away from that anchor, and there is a bias toward interpreting other information around the anchor. For example, the initial price offered for a used car sets the standard for the rest of the negotiations, so that prices lower than the initial price seem more reasonable even if they are still higher than what the car is really worth.

Priming
Priming is the implicit memory effect in which exposure to a stimulus influences response to a later stimulus. It is a technique in psychologyused to train a person’s memory both in positive and negative ways.


Herding
Herd mentality, or mob mentality, describes how people are influenced by their peers to adopt certain behaviors, follow trends, and/or purchase items. Examples of the herd mentality include stock market trends, superstition and home décor.

Influence and Cascade
An information (or informational) cascade occurs when a person observes the actions of others and then — despite possible contradictions in his/her own private information signals — engages in the same acts. A cascade develops, then, when people “abandon their own information in favor of inferences based on earlier people’s actions”.  Information cascades provide an explanation for how such situations can occur, how likely they are to cascade incorrect information or actions, how such behavior may arise and desist rapidly, and how effective attempts to originate a cascade tend to be under different conditions. By explaining all of these things, the original Independent Cascade model sought to improve on previous models that were unable to explain cascades of irrational behavior, a cascade’s fragility, or the short-lived nature of certain cascades.

There are five key conditions in an information cascade model:

  1. There is a decision to be made— for example, whether to adopt a new technology, wear a new style of clothing, eat in a new restaurant, or support a particular political position
  2. A limited action space exists (e.g. an adopt/reject decision).
  3. People make the decision sequentially, and each person can observe the choices made by those who acted earlier
  4. Each person has some private information that helps guide their decision.
  5. A person can’t directly observe the private information that other people know, but he or she can make inferences about this private information from what they do.

 

Accusations and Psychological Projection

 

Influence and Cascade
An information (or informational) cascade occurs when a person observes the actions of others and then — despite possible contradictions in his/her own private information signals — engages in the same acts. A cascade develops, then, when people “abandon their own information in favor of inferences based on earlier people’s actions”.Information cascades provide an explanation for how such situations can occur, how likely they are to cascade incorrect information or actions, how such behavior may arise and desist rapidly, and how effective attempts to originate a cascade tend to be under different conditions.  By explaining all of these things, the original Independent Cascade model sought to improve on previous models that were unable to explain cascades of irrational behavior, a cascade’s fragility, or the short-lived nature of certain cascades.

There are five key conditions in an information cascade model:

  1. There is a decision to be made— for example, whether to adopt a new technology, wear a new style of clothing, eat in a new restaurant, or support a particular political position
  2. A limited action space exists (e.g. an adopt/reject decision).
  3. People make the decision sequentially, and each person can observe the choices made by those who acted earlier
  4. Each person has some private information that helps guide their decision.
  5. A person can’t directly observe the private information that other people know, but he or she can make inferences about this private information from what they do.

How Much a Troll Is Paid

According to people who actually do this for a living, a low level troll can make $200 – $300 per month for 2-3 hours of work a week once they develop a routine. Higher ups have been rumored to pull in over a $1000 a month, and get perks ranging from paid vacations to event tickets. They are also required to sign confidentiality agreements, allowing the companies behind them to remain hidden.

http://www.mamavation.com/2014/10/internet-trolls-online-nuisances-or-corporate-shills.html

 

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